In Patient Unit

in_patient_unit_banner

Our hospice is a safe and tranquil place where you can be cared for. Sometimes people need to come into our 12 bed In Patient Unit to get their symptoms controlled, or so they and their family can have a break. Others come to the hospice at the very end of their life when care elsewhere can’t meet their needs.

Care is delivered 24 hours a day within the In Patient unit. Our team of nurses, doctors and social workers, complementary therapists and physiotherapists will work with you to plan your care.

All of the spacious, light and well equipped rooms open onto our peaceful gardens, so that you and your friends and family, can enjoy the beautiful surroundings.

You and your family and friends can also join in various social activities held in the Woodgrange Centre such as table top gardening and candlelit suppers.

  • We are able to admit people to our In Patient Unit from home, hospital, or other care settings when we agree this is the best place to manager your symptoms, concerns and issues.
  • Your nursing team will regularly review your treatment with you and support you to make decisions about your current or future care.
  • If you’re at the very end of your life, coming into the hospice means we can care for you and your family so that you all feel comfortable.

What our patients and families say

"My wife had several admissions to the St Luke’s Hospice In Patient Unit for symptom control. Our children and I could relax, knowing that she was being well cared for, and I had the peace of mind that I could call the nurses at any time, day or night"

What the Care Quality Commission say

"People told us they were treated with kindness and compassion and their dignity was respected by all staff they had met during their time at the hospice. We saw that staff had taken time to get to know people and their relatives and friends . This ensured peoples individual needs were known and met. Staff had the flexibility to spend more time to support people who had no relatives or friends who could visit them. Staff made sure they knew about what was important to people and reflected this in the care they provided. People spoke positively about the caring staff who listenened to them." Care Quality Commission Report April 2014